Amanda Ribbans

 

Amanda studied graphic design in London where she explored lithography and screen-printing for poster design projects.

 

After graduating she became a designer and then the senior designer at the South Bank Centre. She was responsible for designing and illustrating the publicity materials for many major cross arts festivals. Two of her posters were awarded ‘Best Poster of the Year’ by the International Society for the Promotion of Performing Arts.

 

As a freelance designer she has continued to work for the arts, as well as broadening her client base to include education and charities.

 

The prospect of inheriting a beautiful Columbian press, prompted Amanda to sign up to a printmaking class at Richmond Adult College where she rekindled her love of printmaking, but with an emphasis on screen printing and linocuts.

 

She now makes her prints in a garden shed studio.

 

Her subjects are reactions to life experiences that have triggered a moment of happiness. She hopes that despite people not knowing the back-story, some of the feelings that motivated the image, will transfer to the viewer. Her design background has an obvious influence on her work, which is often bold and reductive; a combination of observation and imagination.

Golden Hare.jpg

Golden Hare

Linocut 18w x 14h

£50

 

Pop.jpg

**Pop

Linocut 15 x15

£65

I Know.jpg

I Know

Screenprint and Linocut20w x 32h

£100

Cats.jpg

Rocket and Luna

Linocut

39.5 x 30h

£120

Yellow Royal Festival Hall.jpg

Yellow Royal Festival Hall

Linocut 30w x 39.5

£100

Here Today.jpg

Here Today

Linocut

30w x 40h

£100

Good Morning.jpg

Good Morning

Linocut20.5w x 22h

£100

Spring.jpg

Spring

Linocut15w x 15w

£65

Down at Cow Gap.jpg
River Swimmer.jpg

Down at Cow Gap

Screenprint and Linocut 21w x 31h

£80

River Swimmer

Linocut30w x 22h

£100

Pebble Tower.jpg

Pebble Tower

Linocut 30 x 39.5

£120

1. Terns 30x20cm Linocut £120F £80UF .jpg

Terns *

30cm x 20cm Linocut

Framed £120 Unframed £80

’*Terns’ print story

“Early one morning in August, when the day was set to be fair. I visited a wild and empty beach in Northumberland with two of my favourite people. We had hard boiled eggs, a bag of Frazzles and a flask of coffee as a picnic breakfast. The sand dunes were edged with waving Marram grass and the sea was numbingly cold. But what struck me most were the Common Terns; there were masses of them squawking overhead, slicing through the air and plunging into the sea for fish. I’d never seen this before. It was one of the many beautiful wildlife spots of our trip which included: dolphins, puffins, seals and a hare. Of course it loo’ked nothing like this, it’s been mangled by my imagination, but I’ve loved trying to capture what I felt in that moment. ”